“Monday is Wash Day” (Reposted from 2/9/15)

Posted on by mcmoller

It seems I have gotten into a routine and have designated Mondays as wash day. Mondays can be pretty quiet around the pueblo; most restaurants and some stores are closed; many are recovering from their partying and drinking all weekend. That is not our case although we occasionally will go out on Friday or Saturday night. Being retired, it doesn’t really matter what day we go out or wash clothes. Nevertheless, on most Monday mornings after coffee, I pull off the sheets, separate clothes and linens into 3 piles (linens, colored clothing, & whites), and start up the washer. These days the regular water pressure is very low. We have a pressure pump for our hot water. But for other than whites, cold water is only used for washing and all rinse cycles. So with cold water dripping into the washer tub, wash day becomes pretty much an all day activity. We do have a gas dryer that runs off the butane tanks, but some things just get hung up to air dry. After the washer fills up, I then will water the potted plants and gardens, front and back. *A note to my friends back in the U.S.- this may be something a little different (or not). The dryer vent hose is attached to a lint trap reservoir. I have to clean it out and add about a cup of water once a week before starting up the dryer. Although we have a lint trap screen as well, some lint does escape through the vent hose. In our case, as in many homes in Panama, our washer and dryer are located outside on our back patio. So with this device, the lint doesn’t blow all over the tile floor. My guess is for the water to collect the lint inside the reservoir. I never had one of these in the U.S., but it is good for those who may have no vent to the outside or just don’t want the lint to blow everywhere.

imageimage

Speaking of partying during the weekend, this past weekend was no exception for Pedasí. We did go out to a restaurant Saturday night. There are new owners of the restaurant and hostel “Tortuga Lodge” where we first stayed for 7 weeks when we moved to Pedasí. It was supposed to be “Dance Night”, and although many of our friends were there, along with meeting some new people, hardly anyone danced. Unfortunately the new owners are not prepared for big crowds, even though they advertised well for the event. Anyway, the Mexican food was good when we finally got it.

We did go to the beach the next day and went swimming. The tide was in, so there was not much “beach”. But the water was warm as usual and renews my soul. As far as the rest of the weekend, an early celebration, call it a practice, for Carnival went on in the center of town with the usual loud horns & drums playing “tipico” music, the “Abajo” (downtown) queen dancing, people singing, firecrackers popping, and fireworks in the sky all day and late into the night. I uploaded and shared a video on my Facebook timeline. And now it is Monday; all is quiet until Friday when Carnival starts. This past weekend was only a small taste of what is to come – Mardi Gra Panamanian style. The hostels, hotels, and private homes will be slowly filling up this week with visitors, most already booked for the 5-6 days of celebrations. This being our third Carnival in Pedasí, we may just stay home, possibly venturing out to see a couple of parades (there are 2 every day). We have learned if we want to sleep, to shut our bedroom windows and turn on the air conditioner to drown out some of the noise at night. The first official full day of Carnival this year is on Valentine’s Day, not widely celebrated in Panama; we may go out to a restaurant that evening, with a reservation.

Of course we will be walking everywhere during Carnival. We have gotten used to walking anyway and driving in this little town when the population has increased tenfold would be challenging among all the people and parked cars on the street. Besides our car is back in the shop. The repairs on the engine are fine, but now our rear brakes have gone out and the front tie rods need replaced. We bought an older car and it has worked well for us for over a year, but eventually things need to be replaced. I just wish it didn’t happen all at once or so close together. So again Mikkel has to order parts before the mechanic can fix the car; at least he knows where to go now. Again he will probably take a bus to Las Tablas and our friend Tim has offered to help. And it will probably again be a lot less expensive than in the U.S. Hopefully it won’t take another 35 days like the last time. God certainly knows we both need the exercise. Mikkel just shared today that he had no problem walking to and back twice to the mechanic, whereas in December he had to stop and rest when walking there. It is only about 6-7 blocks away. I believe all the walking has made us healthier.

I have realized since the car broke down the first time (December 24th), I have actually never been out of Pedasí. Mikkel has taken a bus a few times to Las Tablas, and when the car was recently back, he went to Chitré to buy supplies we can’t find here. We have found most everything we need here and still have plenty of meat and fish in the freezer. A lot of things we can actually buy off the street. Most every day a truck or cart will go by the house, honking their horn, blasting an announcement over a speaker or ringing a bell, to sell their local and fresh goods: “sandia” (watermelon), “melón”, piña (pineapple), papaya, “tomatis” (tomatoes), cebollas (onions), “camarones” (shrimp), “pan” (bread), etc. It reminds me of my childhood when the “Helms” bakery or the “Good Humor” ice cream truck would come down the street of my home tooting their horn or playing a musical jingle. Also, we live next to the “fish man”, Niato, who scales, cleans, and cuts fish for the local fisherman, and occasionally has fresh fish to sell. So we have been blessed with a beautiful home, good neighbors, many friends, and plenty of places and people to locally buy what we need. Since I have been walking all over town, I think the townspeople are getting to recognize me more and more. I do look forward, though, to travel and explore more of Panama once again some day. But for now, I really enjoy this “third” life God has blessed me with in Pedasí.

Our "vecino" (neighbor) Niato.

Our “vecino” (neighbor) Niato.

Typical food truck comes through the neighborhood.

Typical food truck comes through the neighborhood.

Categories: Adventure, Expat, Panama, Pedasi, Retirees, Travel

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2 thoughts on “Monday is Wash Day”

  1. How very cool that the fresh veggies come to you! We are vegetarians but also eat fish. Yes, keep walking as it is great exercise and you will feel great. Many blessings yo you and hopefully the car repairs won’t be to expensive!

    Barbara

  2. thepazeras

    Nice post!

rinking all weekend. That is not our case although we occasionally will go out on Friday or Saturday night. Being retired, it doesn’t really matter what day we go out or wash clothes. Nevertheless, on most Monday mornings after coffee, I pull off the sheets, separate clothes and linens into 3 piles (linens, colored clothing, & whites), and start up the washer. These days the regular water pressure is very low. We have a pressure pump for our hot water. But for other than whites, cold water is only used for washing and all rinse cycles. So with cold water dripping into the washer tub, wash day becomes pretty much an all day activity. We do have a gas dryer that runs off the butane tanks, but some things just get hung up to air dry. After the washer fills up, I then will water the potted plants and gardens, front and back. *A note to my friends back in the U.S.- this may be something a little different (or not). The dryer vent hose is attached to a lint trap reservoir. I have to clean it out and add about a cup of water once a week before starting up the dryer. Although we have a lint trap screen as well, some lint does escape through the vent hose. In our case, as in many homes in Panama, our washer and dryer are located outside on our back patio. So with this device, the lint doesn’t blow all over the tile floor. My guess is for the water to collect the lint inside the reservoir. I never had one of these in the U.S., but it is good for those who may have no vent to the outside or just don’t want the lint to blow everywhere.

imageimage

Speaking of partying during the weekend, this past weekend was no exception for Pedasí. We did go out to a restaurant Saturday night. There are new owners of the restaurant and hostel “Tortuga Lodge” where we first stayed for 7 weeks when we moved to Pedasí. It was supposed to be “Dance Night”, and although many of our friends were there, along with meeting some new people, hardly anyone danced. Unfortunately the new owners are not prepared for big crowds, even though they advertised well for the event. Anyway, the Mexican food was good when we finally got it.

We did go to the beach the next day and went swimming. The tide was in, so there was not much “beach”. But the water was warm as usual and renews my soul. As far as the rest of the weekend, an early celebration, call it a practice, for Carnival went on in the center of town with the usual loud horns & drums playing “tipico” music, the “Abajo” (downtown) queen dancing, people singing, firecrackers popping, and fireworks in the sky all day and late into the night. I uploaded and shared a video on my Facebook timeline. And now it is Monday; all is quiet until Friday when Carnival starts. This past weekend was only a small taste of what is to come – Mardi Gra Panamanian style. The hostels, hotels, and private homes will be slowly filling up this week with visitors, most already booked for the 5-6 days of celebrations. This being our third Carnival in Pedasí, we may just stay home, possibly venturing out to see a couple of parades (there are 2 every day). We have learned if we want to sleep, to shut our bedroom windows and turn on the air conditioner to drown out some of the noise at night. The first official full day of Carnival this year is on Valentine’s Day, not widely celebrated in Panama; we may go out to a restaurant that evening, with a reservation.

Of course we will be walking everywhere during Carnival. We have gotten used to walking anyway and driving in this little town when the population has increased tenfold would be challenging among all the people and parked cars on the street. Besides our car is back in the shop. The repairs on the engine are fine, but now our rear brakes have gone out and the front tie rods need replaced. We bought an older car and it has worked well for us for over a year, but eventually things need to be replaced. I just wish it didn’t happen all at once or so close together. So again Mikkel has to order parts before the mechanic can fix the car; at least he knows where to go now. Again he will probably take a bus to Las Tablas and our friend Tim has offered to help. And it will probably again be a lot less expensive than in the U.S. Hopefully it won’t take another 35 days like the last time. God certainly knows we both need the exercise. Mikkel just shared today that he had no problem walking to and back twice to the mechanic, whereas in December he had to stop and rest when walking there. It is only about 6-7 blocks away. I believe all the walking has made us healthier.

I have realized since the car broke down the first time (December 24th), I have actually never been out of Pedasí. Mikkel has taken a bus a few times to Las Tablas, and when the car was recently back, he went to Chitré to buy supplies we can’t find here. We have found most everything we need here and still have plenty of meat and fish in the freezer. A lot of things we can actually buy off the street. Most every day a truck or cart will go by the house, honking their horn, blasting an announcement over a speaker or ringing a bell, to sell their local and fresh goods: “sandia” (watermelon), “melón”, piña (pineapple), papaya, “tomatis” (tomatoes), cebollas (onions), “camarones” (shrimp), “pan” (bread), etc. It reminds me of my childhood when the “Helms” bakery or the “Good Humor” ice cream truck would come down the street of my home tooting their horn or playing a musical jingle. Also, we live next to the “fish man”, Niato, who scales, cleans, and cuts fish for the local fisherman, and occasionally has fresh fish to sell. So we have been blessed with a beautiful home, good neighbors, many friends, and plenty of places and people to locally buy what we need. Since I have been walking all over town, I think the townspeople are getting to recognize me more and more. I do look forward, though, to travel and explore more of Panama once again some day. But for now, I really enjoy this “third” life God has blessed me with in Pedasí.

Our "vecino" (neighbor) Niato.
Our “vecino” (neighbor) Niato.
Typical food truck comes through the neighborhood.
Typical food truck comes through the neighborhood.

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